Empty nets in Louisiana three years after the Deep Horizon oil spill

“Since the spill, my shrimp production is off between 40 and 60% for the two years that I did work full time,” said Barisich, who has both a shrimp boat and an oyster boat tied up at Yscloskey. “But my price is off another 50%, and my fuel is high: 60 cents a gallon higher than it’s ever been.”

Figures from Louisiana’s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries tell a similar story.

The statewide oyster catch since 2010 is down 27% from the average haul between 2002 and 2009, according to catch statistics from the agency. In the Pontchartrain Basin, where Encalade and Barisich both work, the post-spill average fell to about a third of the pre-spill catch.

Barisich says oysters are barely worth the effort anymore.

Guys running five or six hundred traps are coming in with two to three boxes, if that.

Darren Stander”On the state ground — on a perfect weather day, keep that in mind — it’s 20 sacks a day,” he said. “Twenty sacks a day at $30 a sack is $600. $300 worth of fuel. $100 worth of other expenses and I pay the deckhand, I got $150 a day on a perfect day. It don’t pay to go out.”
Source: CNN

Republican Moocher. Mooch: to get or take without paying or at another's expense; sponge:

What are they complaining about now?

So what if two-thirds of U.S. oysters come from the Gulf Coast. We need more oil drilling jobs!

Oysters after the BP oil spill

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